My Rhinoplasty Review/Story/Journey

I had been wanting a rhinoplasty for as long as I could remember prior to getting my nose job. Many wouldn’t know this (I was much too prideful), but I hated the bump on my nose that was visible from a side view. I don’t come from a wealthy family, nor did I feel comfortable asking my parents for a cosmetic procedure, so I waited to act on fixing my insecurity. As soon as I felt 100% confident in my decision and had a job that could fund the procedure, I began researching rhinoplasty doctors in my area. Sadly, they were terribly expensive. I did learn some valuable information from these doctors, however, such that my nasal “imperfection” (remember, it’s a matter of opinion) was referred to as a dorsal hump.

After some deep Google digging, I found out that Beirut, Lebanon is the “nose job capital” of the world. I was also pleased to find out that their prices were ¼ of what the procedure costs in the states. I did all of my prep work via e-mail including photoshopped after photos. I will admit that working with a doctor 100% via the web isn’t for everyone, however, I was at a point that I believed there was no way my nose could possibly get worse. People often deem my departure as brave, however, there was nothing more I wanted at the time than an improved nose. The cost for my hotel, procedure, and flight was around $3000 total (in comparison to the $8000 quote I had gotten from a local doctor).

I arrived in Beirut on a Monday and had my procedure the following day. Dr. Nizar was incredibly sweet and understanding when I reminded him of some of my qualms. I stressed “please don’t make my nose too upturned” or “please make sure it looks natural”, and he smiled and promised that I would look great. On the day of my procedure, I was taken into a room with a single operating table and introduced to an anesthesiologist. I remember saying as I was laid out on the table with an IV in my arm that “I don’t think anesthesia works on me”.  Before I had a chance to receive a reply, I woke up in a daze in the next room with a bandage on my nose and a rolling IV attached to my arm. It seemed like an eternity before I could gather the energy to get up, but it was realistically probably only a couple of hours. Once I came out of my fog and got the green light to leave I went back to my hotel as if nothing major had happened. It was quite humorous actually, as I passed multiple women on the streets with the same nose cast I was wearing. I spent the next 5 days at the pool of my hotel before getting the cast removed the day before departed back to the United States. Contrary to many stories I hear, my procedure was 100% pain-free. I didn’t even fill my pain killer prescription.

It’s been 3 years since my procedure and I don’t regret it one bit. My only regret I have is not having gone a little further with my change, such as to suggest also making my tip more refined (I was already going under the knife, I may as well have gotten “the perfect nose” vs. “an improved nose”). I’ve noticed that once I mention the procedure, there are many men and woman who confess to me that they too have felt insecure about their nose (or another body part). Although I encourage long, hard thinking before going under the knife, I believe it is a great option for someone struggling with accepting a particular genetic trait they don’t like. I feel as though a look like what I was meant to look like and my confidence has definitely increased.

For more information, here is a Youtube video that goes into more detail of both my and my best friend’s rhinoplasty procedure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyjzLxHcPJA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s